The Doctrine of God – Gospel in Life
Sermon

The Doctrine of God

Tim Keller |  May 30, 2004

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Topics:
  • Doctrine
Duration:
40:51
Scripture:
Psalm 139:1-24
SKU:
RS 175-1

Understanding Psalm 139:1–24

When we dive into Psalm 139, we find three characteristics of God that might seem hard to fit together: He is everywhere (we can’t escape Him), He knows everything (which can be scary), and He brings joy and change (which is amazing). These ideas might feel tough to understand, but they are crucial to what the Bible teaches us about who God is.

1. God is everywhere

In this psalm, David talks about four key things about God: He knows everything, He’s always there, He’s incredibly powerful, and He’s just and holy. He’s teaching us that we can ask God for help when things are unfair, but we shouldn’t wish bad things on people who hurt us. This is something Jesus showed us too. The psalm also reminds us that it’s important to recognize that God is always with us and has power over everything.

2. God can be scary

David’s relationship with God shows us that it’s not always easy knowing that God knows everything about us. This is similar to a story about a girl named Charlene who’s trying to find her purpose in life. There’s a story by Jean-Paul Sartre that shows how scary it can be to know that someone can see everything about you and might reject you. But David shows us how to deal with this fear and desire to be loved at the same time.

3. God brings joy and change

David didn’t always see God as scary. He came to see God as a guide and a support, showing us that God’s power isn’t something to be afraid of but something that can set us free. There’s a moment in the psalm where David goes from fearing God to wanting to understand Him more. This shows us how important it is to know that God loves us and wants us to be open with Him. In the end, we’re reminded that Jesus knows what it’s like to suffer, and the Holy Spirit offers us a close relationship with God. We’re encouraged to accept this truth without fear.

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February Book Offer

Put Your Hope Not in Lesser gods, But in the One True God

In his book Counterfeit Gods, Tim Keller shows us how a proper understanding of the Bible reveals the truth about societal ideals and our own hearts — and that there is only one God who can wholly satisfy our cravings and fulfill our hopes.

February Book Offer

Put Your Hope Not in Lesser gods, But in the One True God

In his book Counterfeit Gods, Tim Keller shows us how a proper understanding of the Bible reveals the truth about societal ideals and our own hearts — and that there is only one God who can wholly satisfy our cravings and fulfill our hopes.